Phenological sensitivity to climate across taxa and trophic levels

Thackeray et al. 2016

This study used data from many of the UK’s long-term biological monitoring schemes, including records from Nature’s Calendar. The species chosen for the study included primary producers, primary consumers and secondary consumers. It was found that for climate changes predicted for the 2050s, the changes in seasonal timing of phenological events are likely to be greatest for primary consumers. This threatens the synchronisation of interactions between trophic levels.


Read the abstract in Nature.

 

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